Buddhism Meditation

One Thing Buddha has in Common with Nike

In an article by the Theravada Bhikkhu Ven. Jayasaro for Lions Roar titled “Just Do It”, he talks about a core value of the Buddha’s path; intelligent desire and motivation. A quality often referred to as Chanda. In the article, Ajahn Jayasaro describes the atmosphere he was trained in and recollects some words from his teacher, “As I recall, in those days after evening chanting, Ajahn Chah would often say, “Now is the time to go back to your kutis and put forth effort.” He didn’t say, “Go back and meditate.” So our practice was conceived in terms of effort, and it was the putting forth of effort that was important. The willingness and interest to do…”

In Nike’s slogan “Just Do It” they tap into something similar that is at the core of humanity. The need to develop the proper desire and motivation to do, to push and excel in our activities. It’s a good thing.

“The Buddha spoke of two kinds of desire: desire that arises from ignorance and delusion, which is called tanha, craving, and desire that arises from wisdom and intelligence, which is called kusala-chanda, or dhamma-chanda, or most simply chanda. Chanda has a range of meanings, but in this case I’m using it to mean wise and intelligent desire and motivation, which the Buddha stressed as being absolutely fundamental to any progress on the eightfold path.”

Jayasaro

Ven. Ajahn Jayasaro has some great talks out here on the internet. I was happy to see this article he wrote recently. Check it out if you want to read the full article https://www.lionsroar.com/just-do-it/.

If you are just beginning and want to learn a great and simple meditation technique try mindfulness of breathing (Anapanasati) from the Buddha’s teaching in the Anapanasati Sutta.

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One comment

  1. This is very interesting: “The Buddha spoke of two kinds of desire: desire that arises from ignorance and delusion, which is called tanha, craving, and desire that arises from wisdom and intelligence, which is called kusala-chanda, or dhamma-chanda, or most simply chanda. Chanda has a range of meanings, but in this case I’m using it to mean wise and intelligent desire and motivation, which the Buddha stressed as being absolutely fundamental to any progress on the eightfold path.”

    Liked by 1 person

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